Persons are deemed to belong to the Virgin Islands based on the following categories:

  • Born in the Virgin Islands of a mother or father who is:
    • A British Overseas Territory Citizen (BOTC) by virtue of birth, registration, naturalisation or by descent from a father or mother who was born in the Virgin Islands
    • Settled in the Virgin Islands
  • Born in the Virgin Islands of a mother or father who is deemed to belong to the Virgin Islands by birth or descent.
  • The child adopted in the Virgin Islands by a person who is deemed to belong to the Virgin Islands by birth or descent.
  • Is born outside the Virgin Islands of a father or mother who is a BOTC by virtue of birth in the Virgin Islands or descent from a father or mother who was born in the Virgin Islands or who belongs to the Virgin Islands by virtue of birth in the Virgin Islands or descent from a father or mother who was born in the Virgin Islands.
  • Is a British Overseas Territories Citizen by virtue of registration in the Virgin Islands.
  • Is a person to whom a certificate has been granted under section 16 of the Immigration and Passport Act 1977 of the Virgin Islands.
  • Is the spouse of a person who belongs to the Virgin Islands and has been granted a certificate under section 16 of the Act.

 

A belonger is a person deemed to belong to the Virgin Islands.

An Authorised Officer means a person occupying a designated public office to which the functions of the Governor pursuant to section 92 (8) or 93(3) of the Virgin Islands Constitution have been delegated to. An Authorised Officer may recruit, select and hire employees; administer disciplinary proceedings and develop and implement career and succession plans. The positions designated as Authorised Officers are: the Financial Secretary, Permanent Secretaries, Cabinet Secretary, Attorney General and the Commissioner of Police.
All permanent and pensionable employees with at least three (3) years of service are eligible to apply for study leave through the Training Division.

The following persons are eligible to be claimants of the Fund for the types of relief assistance indicated below:

  • Individuals losing accommodations or possessions
  • Persons whose homes are badly damaged by the event
  • Self employed individuals who have suffered direct loss of livelihood and whose Insurance Agency does not cover loss from such events
  • Person who have been evacuated
  • Non-Profit Organisations

Relief assistance may take the following forms:

  • food relief
  • shelter or emergency accommodation grant
  • material or equipment for livelihood such as in Fisheries and Agriculture
  • medical assistance
  • financial grants

A completed copy of the Emergency Relief and Assistance Form must first be submitted to the Department of Disaster Management within two weeks of the disaster/emergency.  Attach to the form any relevant pictures/detailed reports and insurance documents pertaining to the incident.  Once verified by the Department of Disaster Management, the claim will be forwarded to the Ministry of Finance for further processing.

In processing claims, the Ministry of Finance shall seek the advice of the Fund Committee.  Advice may be sought from the Attorney General's Chambers if necessary.  Final decisions will be communicated to the claimant by the Ministry of Finance.

The Bupa Secure Care BVI policy requires that insureds notify USA Medical Services as soon as you know that you will need medical treatment. When you pre-notify, the staff at USA Medical Servies begins handling the case, communicating directly with the patient's doctor and medical facility. As soon as all the necessary information is received from your provider, including medical records, Bupa will confirm your benefits and coordinate direct payment. Additionally, USA Medical Services can also coordinate and schedule air ambulances, appointments with specialists, and other medical services. Emergency treatments must be notified within 72 hours of beginning such treatment. Regular office visits do not require notification.
Records of permanent historical and cultural value are stored in The Archives; the mandate of which is to serve as the official repository to preserve, arrange, describe and subsequently make available the records in its care for research and reference. Since these records tell the story of the Virgin Islands and its people, access to them is imperative for various reasons such as: to act as evidence in court cases; verification of dates of birth, death and other personal or public events; ownership of land; property boundaries; chronicling historical events for educational materials; genealogical research etc.

A person would require a Belonger's Card as proof of thier immigration status in the Territory. This allows free travel in and out of the Territory. Holders can reside and work in the Virgin Islands free from immigration control, purchase property, apply for trade licences and vote in the Territory.

Records created in the course of an organization's business transactions are a vitally important asset. They provide authentic and reliable evidence of those transactions. This integrity is of instant value to the creating department in managing its own affairs and for accountability - to auditors, shareholders and to the public. No government or organization can possess a collective memory and operate effectively without the practice of efficient record keeping. Citizens also have a general right to obtain information about the activities carried out by departments and organizations acting on their behalf. This right is essential for democratic accountability and also if public bodies are to be subject to informed public scrutiny. However, it must also be recognized that the individual citizen has a right to privacy concerning personally sensitive data supplied in confidence to government or private organizations. Adherence to the requirements of Freedom of Information legislation, or any applicable legislation is essential. Researchers, academic historians and students will make use of historical records to study the policies and actions of the organizations themselves but also for genealogy and other exploitive endeavours. Good records management can help a government achieve the following: policy objectives, a stronger economy, improved social services and health care, good governance, world class education, improved communication and infrastructure, sustainable natural resources and generally improved service to its citizens.

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